Category Archives: Science

Classifying real live animals!

In a world so wide and full of delight, I learned about creatures, both big and slight. With curious eyes, I explore each day, Discovering how living things hold sway.

First, let’s talk about reptiles, you see, Slithering snakes and turtles are they. Scales on their bodies, like a shiny coat, They crawl on land and can even float.

Amphibians are next in my rhyme, Frogs and toads, having a splendid time. They start as eggs in water so cool, then turn into tadpoles, that’s the rule.

Mammals are furry, warm-blooded and dear, With mothers who nurture and hold us near. Dogs, cats, and humans, just to name a few, We feed our young with milk, that’s what we do.

Lastly, we have fish, living in the sea, With gills to breathe, how amazing they be! From tiny goldfish to great big whales, They swim with grace, tales of watery tales.

Living things, so diverse and grand, Each with a role in nature’s hand. Reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and fish, Teaching us lessons, fulfilling every wish.

So let’s appreciate every living being, Protect their homes, the rivers and the green. For in this world, where we all coexist, We find beauty in nature’s magical twist.

Fun Fear Fun! What can I say? It’s been a very busy summer term with so many amazing activities. Today we had the opportunity of classifying live animals and having a full hands-on experience! Lots of us haven’t handled these animals before and persevered! Mr Lo had to put on a brave face when holding the lizard! haha.

We also talked about the importance of habitats and why it’s important to save the rainforests.

Leave a comment and let us know which animal you enjoyed the most!

Mammals and Birds

Robins have been busy learning all about mammals in their science class 🐾. Today, they headed outside to spot some birds 🦜 too!

Not only did they get to enjoy the fresh air and sunshine ☀️, but they also got to see these incredible creatures up close and personal 🤩. We were thrilled to see so many different species of birds, from tiny sparrows to majestic magpies 🐦.

Fun Facts

Warm blooded animals need to eat a lot more food than cold blooded animals. This is because extra energy is required to keep their bodies at a constant temperature. 

One way warm blooded animals are able to keep a stable temperature is by having  more fat on their bodies. This provides a layer of insulation to the internal body parts. Warm blooded animals often have hair or feathers on their bodies which gives further insulation.

When warm blooded animals get cold, they shiver. The series of contractions warms their muscles and in turn the rest of their body.

Extension: Can you remember which are cold blooded and warm blooded?

Habitats

This half term in Science we are looking at classifying living things and understanding their habitats.

Our first lesson recapped prior knowledge on habitats. Habitats are the environment which plants and animals live. Some species of plant and animal are able to live in multiple habitats, while others have adapted so that they can only live in one type of habitat.

Want to find out more? As a family, enjoy this TV documentary about habitats!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrSWYE37MJs

VLOG: Electronics

Robins were extremely impressed with Isla’s video log on using her new electronics kit. She demonstrated her knowledge learnt on electrical circuits and has shown confidence in speaking aloud. Well done ISLA!

P.S Another shout out to our Robins football team! Well done!!!

Diluting and Dissolving

In science this week the children have been learning about diluting and dissolving.

Dissolving is a process in which a substance known as the ‘solute’ (e.g sugar) dissolves in another substance known as the ‘solvent’ (e.g water). The solute is completely broken down from larger molecules into smaller molecules after contact with the solvent.

We tested out whether a solid was soluble or insoluble by mixing it with water. Soluble solids included sugar and coffee granules. Insoluble solids included sand and a paperclip!

For diluting, we carried out an experiment to investigate how adding water affects the taste of squash.

Trying out different concentrations of squash!

Parallel Circuits

In Science this week we looked at the difference between series circuits and parallel circuits.

The Science Behind the Science

Really basic circuits have a cell, a lamp and a switch. To make the circuit work, these components are connected to the metal connecting wires. When the switch is closed, the lamp lights up. The current will flow all around the circuit. The cell pushes the current around the circuit and as it passes through the lamp, it makes it light up. The current is measured in amps (A), using an ammeter in series. 

There are two types of circuits that we can make: a series circuit or a parallel circuit. Here’s an easy way to remember: if there are branches it’s a parallel circuit and if there are no branches at all, it is a series circuit.  

Just like we see on the TV, series go on and on and on. It is pretty similar in the circuit world.

In a series circuit, you get several components that are lined up one after the other without any branches. If the lamp happens to break or is disconnected somehow, the circuit is broken. This means that all of the components stop working. This is because they are all connected and joined with one another. 

Parallel circuits are a little different. The components in a parallel circuit are connected on different branches of the wire. They are not lined up one after the other. In parallel circuits, there is more than one bulb (resistor) and they are arranged on different paths. Electricity can therefore travel from one end of the cell through different branches to reach the other cell. If a lamp breaks or becomes disconnected in a parallel circuit, the components on the different branches will continue to work. This is because the electricity is flowing through more than one path. If extra lamps are added into a parallel circuit, they do not become dimmer. They stay bright. This is different to a series circuit, where the lamps become dimmer when more are added. Our homes are all wired up with parallel circuit. If one component fails, the others still function.  

Identifying circuits

Robins were asked to think – pair – and share there ideas of how circuits work. Mr Crooks brought in a battery powered torch and asked the children to explain the parts inside and how it all works. Why does a torch emit light? Where is the power source? What other components are there?

Robins then investigated different circuits. They first predicted whether the circuit was complete or incomplete and then tested whether their prediction was true.

Here is some extra reading for you! (Don’t forget to write in your reading record that you have read it!)

The Science Behind the Science

Circuits need power sources such as batteries. Wires are connected to both the positive and negative ends of the battery (or cell). Circuits contain other electrical components such as bulbs and motors, which allow the electricity to pass through them. Electricity will only flow and travel around a circuit that is complete. They cannot have any gaps or else the electricity cannot pass through and there must be no short circuits. 

The basic parts of a circuit include: the battery, the wire(s), the bulb(s), buzzer(s), motor(s) and switches (on and off). When the switch is open, there is a gap in the circuit. This means that the switch is off, and that electricity cannot pass around the circuit. When the switch is closed, the electricity can travel around the circuit and the light bulb is switched on. If you add more batteries to a circuit, this will increase the power source (electrical energy) and will make the bulb a lot brighter. The more bulbs you add to a simple circuit, the less the electrical energy, which will make the bulbs a lot dimmer. 

If you have longer wires, the electrical energy has a lot longer to travel around the circuit. This will also make the bulb a lot dimmer. Motors rotate when electrical energy is flowing around the circuit.  

Basic circuits have a cell, a lamp and a switch. To make the circuit work, these components are connected to the metal connecting wires. As discussed above, when the switch is closed, the lamp lights up. The current will flow all around the circuit. The cell pushes the current around the circuit and as it passes through the lamp, it makes it light up. The current is measured in amps (A), using an ammeter in series. 

Exploring circuits

Circuits need power sources such as batteries. Wires are connected to both the positive and negative ends of the battery (or cell). Circuits contain other electrical components such as bulbs and motors, which allow the electricity to pass through them. Electricity will only flow and travel around a circuit that is complete. They cannot have any gaps or else the electricity cannot pass through and there must be no short circuits. 

The basic parts of a circuit include: the battery, the wire(s), the bulb(s), buzzer(s), motor(s) and switches (on and off). When the switch is open, there is a gap in the circuit. This means that the switch is off, and that electricity cannot pass around the circuit. When the switch is closed, the electricity can travel around the circuit as the switch is on. If you add more batteries to a circuit, this will increase the power source (electrical energy) and will make the bulb a lot brighter. The more bulbs you add to a simple circuit, the less the electrical energy, which will make the bulbs a lot dimmer. Motors rotate when electrical energy is flowing around the circuit. Common electrical appliances include: refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, dishwashers, microwaves, ovens, hairdryers, toasters, vacuum cleaners etc. 

Take a look at some of our wonderful robins explaining their circuits.

How is electricity transported?

In Science we asked,

Do you know how an electrical circuit works?
In what ways can electricity be generated?
What are renewable ways of creating electricity?
Can you put a simple circuit together?
What are electrons?

We then explored different simple circuits.

Did you know electric circuits need a power source to work?

They use batteries with wires connected to both the positive and negative terminals. A battery is needed because it gives the force that makes the electrons move. When these electrons reach the light bulb, they give it the necessary power to work. A basic circuit will have a battery (a cell), a lamp and a switch. For the electric current to pass, these components must be connected to the metal connecting wires. When the switch is closed (on), the current can pass through and the lightbulb is switched on. When the switch is open (off), the current can no longer pass through the components successfully and thus the light remains switched off. This is because, there is no continuous path for the current to follow. There is a gap which means that the electricity cannot flow though.  

Electrical Safety

We have started our new topic on Electricity in Science.

We discussed the importance of being safe when working with electricity.

don’t plug many things into one outlet or extension cord, make sure all electrical cords are hidden away, neat and tidy, don’t yank an electrical cord from the wall, put electrical devices out of reach.

As part of the lesson Robins created their own Electrical Safety posters.

Did you know? Whilst electricity provides energy and energy is important because there is no life without energy, there are many dangers associated with it. Humans are really good conductors of electricity. Our bodies are made up of 70% water and electricity moves very quickly through water. This means that electricity can flow very easily through our bodies. This isn’t too good. When we receive an electric shock, our muscles tighten up, our lungs constrict, our heartbeat is interrupted, our blood vessels tighten, and we feel an overwhelming sense of burning. Have you ever had an electric shock? They aren’t the best. Electricity tries to find the quickest way to the ground which makes accidents a lot more probable.

P.S Robins really are super scientists! Isla over the holidays created her own multi-coloured soft balls!

Sound Insulation

Sounds travel through some materials more easily than others. Softer materials absorb sounds better than hard materials, which reflect sound, often producing echoes.
Sound insulation depends on a variety of factors, which include the type of material used, and the volume of the sound involved. In the most common situations, the sound is travelling in the air and, when it comes up against the insulating material, some of the sound is reflected back into the air. As a result, the sound which enters the material is reduced and so has a lower volume. As it travels through the new material it is further reduced, especially if it is a soft, spongy material, which disrupts the sound waves so they become less regular.

Today Robins conducted a fair test, comparing how varied materials can insulate sound.