Category Archives: RE

Easter story

Robins have been exploring God’s response to human suffering in RE today and have been retelling the Easter story.
They also watched a Lego version of the story too.

They are all looking forward to sharing the story in their class assembly tomorrow!

Being merciful and forgiving

Today, Robins have been learning about being merciful and forgiving. Mrs Parry asked the class if they would like to share a time when they had ever broken anything. She told the class about accidentally dropping one of her mother-in-law’s favourite bowls whilst drying up. The class shared some examples together.

They discussed some things that are broken cannot be mended, but it is often possible to mend things that we have broken. If we care for our environment, it is a very good idea to try to mend things rather than always throwing them away and then buying new things. We talked about how these items could be repaired.

– a hole in the toe of my socks? (needle and thread)
– a ripped page in a book? (sellotape)
– a handle that has come off a mug? (superglue
– a puncture in my bike tyre? (puncture kit)
– a cut finger? (sticking plaster)

Mrs Parry asked the children how to repair a broken relationship and explained how Peter, Jesus’ friend had asked him for help. The children heard the parable that Jesus told Peter, called the unforgiving servant and considered forgiveness as a way of mending broken friendships.

Robins visit Sikh temple

As part of Year 4’s RE Sikhism topic, they visited the Sikh temple in Smethwick. They were shown around and were explained the basics of Sikhism. Robins were allowed to take part and observe the prayers in the prayer hall. After, they were taken to the langer hall (kitchen) to have free food (langer) – they all enjoyed chips and beans, some even tried the Indian food being served.

Sikh Amrit ceremony

During today’s RE lesson, Robins learnt more information about what happens at the Sikh Amrit ceremony.

During the ceremony, hymns are recited from the Sikh scripture, prayers are said, and the principles of Sikhism are reminded.

Here’s a short video of the Amrit ceremony.

Sikhs and belonging

Today Robins have been learning how Sikhs show that they belong. The class watched a flim clip about the Amrit festival and learnt about the Baisakhi festival. They recapped on the five Ks of Sikhism which most of the children could remember from Year 3. What fantastic memories – Mrs Parry and Miss Lucas were very impressed!

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The Robins watched this clip –click here.

Jamie remembered the sword (Kirpan)
Sophie remembered the head wear (Kesh)
Millie remembered the hair comb (Kangha)
Nila remembered the bangle (Kara)
Callum remembered the underwear (Kachera)

Belonging and appearance

In RE Robins thought about how they knew they belonged and what they did to show it, to understand how belonging can be shown by outward appearance.

After lots of discussion, they made a class list of ideas and then individually, drew a picture of themselves and labelled what they wore to show how they belonged. Robins went on to consider how following rules, conducting the right behaviour and being responsible all linked in to belonging, – when you are part of a group you are representing it.

Besides school, children belonged to gymnastics clubs, dance clubs, karate, boxing, Brownies, Cubs and the Young Voices choir.

Belonging

In RE Robins thought about how they knew they belonged and what they did to show it, to understand how belonging can be shown by outward appearance.

After lots of discussion, they made a class list of ideas and then individually, drew a picture of themselves and labelled what they wore to show how they belonged. Robins went on to consider how following rules, conducting the right behaviour and being responsible all linked in to belonging, – when you are part of a group you are representing it.

Besides school, children belonged to gymnastics clubs, dance clubs, karate, boxing, Brownies, Cubs and the Young Voices choir.

Importance of being curious

In today’s RE lesson, Robins read a poem by Rudyard Kipling (the author of the Jungle Book) entitled “I keep six honest serving-men.” In his poem he highlights a really important aspect around the growth of children and the importance of being curious by asking questions to find out about the world.

Robins shared some questions they had asked as toddlers and also thought about how younger siblings always ask lots of questions too! We discussed that just accepting things as they are can stop curiosity and cease our reasoning ability from growing. Life is about solving problems. Without the ability to question or reason we can’t find an answer (solution).

We considered the six forms of questions (who, what, where, when, why and how) and children got into groups to generate questions which they would like to find out the answers to!

Here is a selection of some of the questions Robins are curious about…

Why do we need flies?
Why do people drink?
Why do we die?
Why can’t we breathe in space?
Why do people want to be rich?
Why do people cry when they’re upset?

Who first invented school?
Who invented hospitals?
Who made the first burgers?
Who made the earth?
Who invented cars and cups of tea?
Who is the tallest person in the world?

When is the world going to end?
When was the first icecream made?
When was the Queen born?
When was God made/born?
When will I die?

How do I walk and stand upright?
How was the world mad?
How am I am to talk?
How is a whirlpool made?
How come when you tickle yourself it doesn’t tickle?!
How do you get poorly?
How are keys, pencils and rubbers made?

Where Brean within the UK?
Where does God live in the sky?
Where does space end?
Where are all the dinosaur fossils?
Where does money come from?
Where is the sun and moon exactly?

What is the sun and moon made of?
What was it like to live a hundred years ago?
What is the best thing in the world?
What is the meaning of Christmas?
What happens when we die?

Noble truths of Buddhism

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Today, Robins have been learning about the four noble truths of Buddhism and considering how these could be related to our own lives.

To experience the point of view of having more/less than others, Mrs Parry let each child choose either a red, green or yellow counter. Afterwards, she announced that anyone with a green counter would receive a sticker! There was a mixture of responses, reactions and even outbursts in the room as children expressed their feelings!

This enabled the children to reflect and evaluate what it is like to have less or more than one another.

They then had a range of scenarios to read and discuss, referring back to how these could be dealt with using the four noble truths. (Eventually, everyone else had a sticker too!)

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